Command line


The Command line integrationIntegrations connect and integrate Home Assistant with your devices, services, and more. [Learn more] offers functionality that issues specific commands to get data or to control a device.

It’s highly recommended to enclose the command in single quotes ' as it ensures all characters can be used in the command and reduces the risk of unintentional escaping. To include a single quote in a command enclosed in single quotes, double it: ''.

Configuration Variables

command_line list Required

The platforms to use for you command_line integration.

binary_sensor map (Optional)

Binary sensor platform.

command template Required

The action to take to get the value.

command_timeout integer (Optional, default: 15)

Defines number of seconds for command timeout.

device_class string (Optional)

Sets the class of the device, changing the device state and icon that is displayed on the frontend.

name string (Optional, default: Binary Command Sensor)

Let you overwrite the name of the device.

icon template (Optional)

Defines a template for the icon of the entity.

payload_on string (Optional, default: ON)

The payload that represents enabled state.

unique_id string (Optional)

An ID that uniquely identifies this binary sensor. Set this to a unique value to allow customization through the UI.

payload_off string (Optional, default: OFF)

The payload that represents disabled state.

value_template string (Optional)

Defines a template to extract a value from the payload.

availability template (Optional, default: true)

Defines a template to get the available state of the entity. If the template either fails to render or returns True, "1", "true", "yes", "on", "enable", or a non-zero number, the entity will be available. If the template returns any other value, the entity will be unavailable. If not configured, the entity will always be available. Note that string comparisons are not case sensitive; "TrUe" and "yEs" are allowed.

scan_interval integer (Optional, default: 60)

Define time in seconds between each update.

cover map (Optional)

Cover platform.

command_close string Required, default: true

The action to close the cover.

command_open string Required, default: true

The command to open the cover.

command_state string (Optional)

If given, this will act as a sensor that runs in the background and updates the state of the cover. If the command returns a 0 the indicates the cover is fully closed, whereas a 100 indicates the cover is fully open.

command_stop string Required, default: true

The action to stop the cover.

command_timeout integer (Optional, default: 15)

Defines number of seconds for command timeout.

device_class string (Optional)

Sets the class of the device, changing the device state and icon that is displayed on the frontend.

name string Required

The name used to display the cover in the frontend.

icon template (Optional)

Defines a template for the icon of the entity.

unique_id string (Optional)

An ID that uniquely identifies this cover. Set this to a unique value to allow customization through the UI.

value_template template (Optional)

if specified, command_state will ignore the result code of the command but the template evaluating will indicate the position of the cover. For example, if your command_state returns a string “open”, using value_template as in the example configuration above will allow you to translate that into the valid state 100.

availability template (Optional, default: true)

Defines a template to get the available state of the entity. If the template either fails to render or returns True, "1", "true", "yes", "on", "enable", or a non-zero number, the entity will be available. If the template returns any other value, the entity will be unavailable. If not configured, the entity will always be available. Note that string comparisons are not case sensitive; "TrUe" and "yEs" are allowed.

scan_interval integer (Optional, default: 15)

Define time in seconds between each update.

notify map (Optional)

Notify platform.

name string (Optional, default: notify)

Setting the optional parameter name allows multiple notifiers to be created. The notifier will bind to the service notify.NOTIFIER_NAME.

command string Required

The action to take.

command_timeout integer (Optional, default: 15)

Defines number of seconds for command timeout.

sensor map (Optional)

Sensor platform.

command template Required

The action to take to get the value.

command_timeout integer (Optional, default: 15)

Defines number of seconds for command timeout

json_attributes string | list (Optional)

Defines a list of keys to extract values from a JSON dictionary result and then set as sensor attributes.

name string (Optional, default: Command Sensor)

Name of the command sensor.

icon template (Optional)

Defines a template for the icon of the entity.

unique_id string (Optional)

An ID that uniquely identifies this sensor. Set this to a unique value to allow customization through the UI.

unit_of_measurement string (Optional)

Defines the unit of measurement of the sensor, if any.

value_template string (Optional)

Defines a template to extract a value from the payload.

availability template (Optional, default: true)

Defines a template to get the available state of the entity. If the template either fails to render or returns True, "1", "true", "yes", "on", "enable", or a non-zero number, the entity will be available. If the template returns any other value, the entity will be unavailable. If not configured, the entity will always be available. Note that string comparisons are not case sensitive; "TrUe" and "yEs" are allowed.

device_class device_class (Optional)

Sets the class of the device, changing the device state and icon that is displayed on the UI (see below). It does not set the unit_of_measurement.

state_class string (Optional)

The state_class of the sensor. This will display the value based on the Number Format defined in the user profile.

scan_interval integer (Optional, default: 60)

Define time in seconds between each update.

switch map (Optional)

Switch platform.

command_on string Required

The action to take for on.

command_off string Required

The action to take for off.

command_state string (Optional)

If given, this command will be run. Returning a result code 0 will indicate that the switch is on.

command_timeout integer (Optional, default: 15)

Defines number of seconds for command timeout.

name string Required

The name used to display the switch in the frontend.

icon template (Optional)

Defines a template for the icon of the entity.

unique_id string (Optional)

An ID that uniquely identifies this switch. Set this to a unique value to allow customization through the UI.

value_template string (Optional)

If specified, command_state will ignore the result code of the command but the template evaluating to true will indicate the switch is on.

availability template (Optional, default: true)

Defines a template to get the available state of the entity. If the template either fails to render or returns True, "1", "true", "yes", "on", "enable", or a non-zero number, the entity will be available. If the template returns any other value, the entity will be unavailable. If not configured, the entity will always be available. Note that string comparisons are not case sensitive; "TrUe" and "yEs" are allowed.

scan_interval integer (Optional, default: 30)

Define time in seconds between each update.

Binary sensor

To use your Command binary sensor in your installation, add the following to your configuration.yamlThe configuration.yaml file is the main configuration file for Home Assistant. It lists the integrations to be loaded and their specific configurations. In some cases, the configuration needs to be edited manually directly in the configuration.yaml file. Most integrations can be configured in the UI.[Learn more] file:

# Example configuration.yaml entry
command_line:
  - binary_sensor:
      command: "cat /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward"
  - binary_sensor:
      command: "echo 1"

Cover

A command_linecover platform that issues specific commands when it is moved up, down and stopped. It allows anyone to integrate any type of cover into Home Assistant that can be controlled from the command line.

To enable a command line cover in your installation, add the following to your configuration.yamlThe configuration.yaml file is the main configuration file for Home Assistant. It lists the integrations to be loaded and their specific configurations. In some cases, the configuration needs to be edited manually directly in the configuration.yaml file. Most integrations can be configured in the UI.[Learn more] file:

# Example configuration.yaml entry
command_line:
  - cover:
      command_open: move_command up garage
      command_close: move_command down garage
      command_stop: move_command stop garage
      name: Garage

Notify

The command_line platform allows you to use external tools for notifications from Home Assistant. The message will be passed in as STDIN.

To enable those notifications in your installation, add the following to your configuration.yamlThe configuration.yaml file is the main configuration file for Home Assistant. It lists the integrations to be loaded and their specific configurations. In some cases, the configuration needs to be edited manually directly in the configuration.yaml file. Most integrations can be configured in the UI.[Learn more] file:

# Example configuration.yaml entry
command_line:
  - notify:
      command: "espeak -vmb/mb-us1"

To use notifications, please see the getting started with automation page.

Sensor

To enable it, add the following lines to your configuration.yamlThe configuration.yaml file is the main configuration file for Home Assistant. It lists the integrations to be loaded and their specific configurations. In some cases, the configuration needs to be edited manually directly in the configuration.yaml file. Most integrations can be configured in the UI.[Learn more]:

# Example configuration.yaml entry
command_line:
  - sensor:
      command: SENSOR_COMMAND
  - sensor:
      command: SENSOR_COMMAND_2

Switch

The command_line switch platform issues specific commands when it is turned on and off. This might very well become our most powerful platform as it allows anyone to integrate any type of switch into Home Assistant that can be controlled from the command line, including calling other scripts!

To enable it, add the following lines to your configuration.yamlThe configuration.yaml file is the main configuration file for Home Assistant. It lists the integrations to be loaded and their specific configurations. In some cases, the configuration needs to be edited manually directly in the configuration.yaml file. Most integrations can be configured in the UI.[Learn more]:

# Example configuration.yaml entry
command_line:
  - switch:
      name: Kitchen Light
      command_on: switch_command on kitchen
      command_off: switch_command off kitchen

A note on name for cover and switch:

The use of friendly_name and object_id has been deprecated and the slugified name will also be used as identifier.

Use unique_id to enable changing the name from the UI and if required, use the slugified name as identifier.

Execution

The command is executed within the configuration directory.

If you are using Home Assistant Operating System, the commands are executed in the homeassistant container context. So if you test or debug your script, it might make sense to do this in the context of this container to get the same runtime environment.

With a 0 exit code, the output (stdout) of the command is used as value. In case a command results in a non 0 exit code or is terminated by the command_timeout, the result is only logged to Home Assistant log and the sensors value is not updated.

Examples binary sensor platform

In this section you find some real-life examples of how to use the command_line sensor.

SickRage

Check the state of an SickRage instance.

# Example configuration.yaml entry
command_line:
  - binary_sensor:
      command: 'netstat -na | find "33322" | find /c "LISTENING" > nul && (echo "Running") || (echo "Not running")'
      name: "sickragerunning"
      device_class: moving
      payload_on: "Running"
      payload_off: "Not running"

Check RasPlex

Check if RasPlex is online.

command_line:
  - binary_sensor:
      command: 'ping -c 1 rasplex.local | grep "1 received" | wc -l'
      name: "is_rasplex_online"
      device_class: connectivity
      payload_on: 1
      payload_off: 0

An alternative solution could look like this:

command_line:
  - binary_sensor:
      name: Printer
      command: 'ping -W 1 -c 1 192.168.1.10 > /dev/null 2>&1 && echo success || echo fail'
      device_class: connectivity
      payload_on: "success"
      payload_off: "fail"

Consider to use the ping sensor as an alternative to the samples above.

Check if a system service is running

The services running is listed in /etc/systemd/system and can be checked with the systemctl command:

$ systemctl is-active [email protected]
active
$ sudo service [email protected] stop
$ systemctl is-active [email protected]
inactive

A binary command line sensor can check this:

command_line:
  - binary_sensor:
      command: '/bin/systemctl is-active [email protected]'
      payload_on: "active"
      payload_off: "inactive"

Example cover platform

# Example configuration.yaml entry
command_line:
  - cover:
      name: Garage door
      command_open: move_command up garage
      command_close: move_command down garage
      command_stop: move_command stop garage
      command_state: state_command garage
      value_template: >
        {% if value == 'open' %}
        100
        {% elif value == 'closed' %}
        0
        {% endif %}

Examples sensor platform

In this section you find some real-life examples of how to use this sensor.

CPU temperature

Thanks to the proc file system, various details about a system can be retrieved. Here the CPU temperature is of interest. Add something similar to your configuration.yamlThe configuration.yaml file is the main configuration file for Home Assistant. It lists the integrations to be loaded and their specific configurations. In some cases, the configuration needs to be edited manually directly in the configuration.yaml file. Most integrations can be configured in the UI.[Learn more] file:

# Example configuration.yaml entry
command_line:
  - sensor:
      name: CPU Temperature
      command: "cat /sys/class/thermal/thermal_zone0/temp"
      # If errors occur, make sure configuration file is encoded as UTF-8
      unit_of_measurement: "°C"
      value_template: "{{ value | multiply(0.001) | round(1) }}"

Monitoring failed login attempts on Home Assistant

If you’d like to know how many failed login attempts are made to Home Assistant, add the following to your configuration.yamlThe configuration.yaml file is the main configuration file for Home Assistant. It lists the integrations to be loaded and their specific configurations. In some cases, the configuration needs to be edited manually directly in the configuration.yaml file. Most integrations can be configured in the UI.[Learn more] file:

# Example configuration.yaml entry
command_line:
  - sensor:
      name: Badlogin
      command: "grep -c 'Login attempt' /home/hass/.homeassistant/home-assistant.log"

Make sure to configure the Logger integration to monitor the HTTP integration at least the warning level.

# Example working logger settings that works
logger:
  default: critical
  logs:
    homeassistant.components.http: warning

Details about the upstream Home Assistant release

You can see directly in the frontend (Developer tools -> About) what release of Home Assistant you are running. The Home Assistant releases are available on the Python Package Index. This makes it possible to get the current release.

command_line:
  - sensor:
      command: python3 -c "import requests; print(requests.get('https://pypi.python.org/pypi/homeassistant/json').json()['info']['version'])"
      name: HA release

Read value out of a remote text file

If you own devices which are storing values in text files which are accessible over HTTP then you can use the same approach as shown in the previous section. Instead of looking at the JSON response we directly grab the sensor’s value.

command_line:
  - sensor:
      command: python3 -c "import requests; print(requests.get('http://remote-host/sensor_data.txt').text)"
      name: File value

Use an external script

The example is doing the same as the aREST sensor but with an external Python script. It should give you an idea about interfacing with devices which are exposing a RESTful API.

The one-line script to retrieve a value is shown below. Of course it would be possible to use this directly in the configuration.yamlThe configuration.yaml file is the main configuration file for Home Assistant. It lists the integrations to be loaded and their specific configurations. In some cases, the configuration needs to be edited manually directly in the configuration.yaml file. Most integrations can be configured in the UI.[Learn more] file but need extra care about the quotation marks.

python3 -c "import requests; print(requests.get('http://10.0.0.48/analog/2').json()['return_value'])"

The script (saved as arest-value.py) that is used looks like the example below.

#!/usr/bin/python3
from requests import get

response = get("http://10.0.0.48/analog/2")
print(response.json()["return_value"])

To use the script you need to add something like the following to your configuration.yamlThe configuration.yaml file is the main configuration file for Home Assistant. It lists the integrations to be loaded and their specific configurations. In some cases, the configuration needs to be edited manually directly in the configuration.yaml file. Most integrations can be configured in the UI.[Learn more] file.

# Example configuration.yaml entry
command_line:
  - sensor:
      name: Brightness
      command: "python3 /path/to/script/arest-value.py"

Usage of templating in command:

Templates are supported in the command configuration variable. This could be used if you want to include the state of a specific sensor as an argument to your external script.

# Example configuration.yaml entry
command_line:
  - sensor:
      name: Wind direction
      command: "sh /home/pi/.homeassistant/scripts/wind_direction.sh {{ states('sensor.wind_direction') }}"
      unit_of_measurement: "Direction"

Usage of JSON attributes in command output

The example shows how you can retrieve multiple values with one sensor (where the additional values are attributes) by using value_json and json_attributes.

# Example configuration.yaml entry
command_line:
  - sensor:
      name: JSON time
      json_attributes:
        - date
        - milliseconds_since_epoch
      command: "python3 /home/pi/.homeassistant/scripts/datetime.py"
      value_template: "{{ value_json.time }}"

Example switch platform

Change the icon when a state changes

This example demonstrates how to use template to change the icon as its state changes. This icon is referencing its own state.

command_line:
  - switch:
      name: Driveway outside sensor
      command_on: >
        curl -X PUT -d '{"on":true}' "http://ip_address/api/sensors/27/config/"
      command_off: >
        curl -X PUT -d '{"on":false}' "http://ip_address/api/sensors/27/config/"
      command_state: curl http://ip_address/api/sensors/27/
      value_template: >
        {{value_json.config.on}}
      icon: >
        {% if value_json.config.on == true %} mdi:toggle-switch
        {% else %} mdi:toggle-switch-off
        {% endif %}

aREST device

The example below is doing the same as the aREST switch. The command line tool curl is used to toggle a pin which is controllable through REST.

# Example configuration.yaml entry
command_line:
  - switch:
      command_on: "/usr/bin/curl -X GET http://192.168.1.10/digital/4/1"
      command_off: "/usr/bin/curl -X GET http://192.168.1.10/digital/4/0"
      command_state: "/usr/bin/curl -X GET http://192.168.1.10/digital/4"
      value_template: '{{ value == "1" }}'
      name: Kitchen Lightswitch

Given this example, in the UI one would see the friendly_name of “Kitchen Light”. However, the identifier is arest_pin_four, making the entity_id switch.arest_pin_four, which is what one would use in automation or in API calls.

Shutdown your local host

This switch will shutdown your system that is hosting Home Assistant.

This switch will shutdown your host immediately, there will be no confirmation.
# Example configuration.yaml entry
command_line:
  - switch:
      name: Home Assistant System Shutdown
      command_off: "/usr/sbin/poweroff"

Control your VLC player

This switch will control a local VLC media player (Source).

# Example configuration.yaml entry
command_line:
  - switch:
      name: VLC
      command_on: "cvlc 1.mp3 vlc://quit &"
      command_off: "pkill vlc"

Control Foscam motion sensor

This switch will control the motion sensor of Foscam Webcams which Support CGI Commands (Source). This switch supports statecmd, which checks the current state of motion detection.

# Example configuration.yaml entry
command_line:
  - switch:
      name: Foscam Motion
      command_on: 'curl -k "https://ipaddress:443/cgi-bin/CGIProxy.fcgi?cmd=setMotionDetectConfig&isEnable=1&usr=admin&pwd=password"'
      command_off: 'curl -k "https://ipaddress:443/cgi-bin/CGIProxy.fcgi?cmd=setMotionDetectConfig&isEnable=0&usr=admin&pwd=password"'
      command_state: 'curl -k --silent "https://ipaddress:443/cgi-bin/CGIProxy.fcgi?cmd=getMotionDetectConfig&usr=admin&pwd=password" | grep -oP "(?<=isEnable>).*?(?=</isEnable>)"'
      value_template: '{{ value == "1" }}'
  • Replace admin and password with an “Admin” privileged Foscam user
  • Replace ipaddress with the local IP address of your Foscam

Services

Available services: reload.

Service command_line.reload

Reload all command_line entities.

This service takes no service data attributes.