Broadlink


The Broadlink integration allows you to control and monitor Broadlink universal remotes, smart plugs, power strips, switches and sensors. The following devices are supported:

  • Power Strips: MP1-1K3S2U and MP1-1K4S
  • Sensors: e-Sensor
  • Smart Plugs: SP mini, SP mini+, SP mini 3, SP1, SP2, SP2-CL, SP2-UK/BR/IN, SP3, SP3-EU, SP3S-EU and SP3S-US
  • Universal Remotes: RM mini, RM mini 3, RM pro, RM pro+, RM plus, RM4 mini, RM4 pro and RM4C mini
  • Wi-Fi Controlled Switches: SC1

Configuration

To set up a Broadlink device, click Configuration in the sidebar and click Integrations. If you see your device there, click Configure. If not, click the + icon in the lower right, enter the hostname or IP address of the device and follow the instructions to complete the setup.

Entities and subdomains

There is no more need to set up platforms, except for custom IR/RF switches. Once the device is configured, all entities will be created automatically.

The entities have the same name as the device by default. To change the name, icon or entity id, click the entity on the frontend and click the settings icon in the upper right. You can also disable the entity there if you don’t think it is useful. Don’t forget to click Update to save your changes when you’re done.

The entities are divided into three subdomains:

Remote

The remote entities allow you to control Broadlink universal remotes. You can learn IR codes, send the codes you have learned and send RF codes (use the base64 functionality). These entities are created automatically when you configure a device that has IR/RF capabilities.

Learning IR codes

Use the remote.learn_command service to learn IR codes.

Service data attribute Optional Description
entity_id no ID of the remote.
device no Name of the device to be controlled.
command no Names of the commands to be learned.
alternative yes Are they toggle commands?

Example 1: Learn a single command

# Example configuration.yaml entry
script:
  learn_mute_tv:
    sequence:
      - service: remote.learn_command
        data:
          entity_id: remote.bedroom
          device: television
          command: ok

Example 2: Learn a sequence of commands

# Example configuration.yaml entry
script:
  learn_tv_commands:
    sequence:
      - service: remote.learn_command
        data:
          entity_id: remote.bedroom
          device: television
          command:
            - turn on
            - turn off
            - volume up
            - volume down

Example 3: Learn a toggle command

The alternative flag is useful for capturing commands in which the same button is used for more than one purpose, such as the power button, which can turn the television on and off.

# Example configuration.yaml entry
script:
  learn_tv_power_button:
    sequence:
      - service: remote.learn_command
        data:
          entity_id: remote.bedroom
          device: television
          command: power
          alternative: true

In the above example, two codes will be captured for the power command, and they will be sent alternately each time this command is called.

Learned codes storage location

The learned codes are stored in the /configuration/.storage folder in a file called broadlink_remote_xxxxxxxxxxx_codes.json. You can open this file with a text editor and copy the codes to set up a custom switch, but beware: the files in the .storage folder should never be edited manually.

Sending IR/RF codes

Use the remote.send_command service to send IR/RF codes.

Service data attribute Optional Description
entity_id no ID of the remote.
command no Names of the commands to be sent or base64 codes prefixed with b64:.
device yes Name of the device to be controlled (optional for base64 codes).
num_repeats yes Number of times to repeat the commands.
delay_secs yes Interval in seconds between one send and another.

Example 1: Send a single command

# Example configuration.yaml entry
script:
  mute_tv:
    sequence:
      - service: remote.send_command
        data:
          entity_id: remote.bedroom
          device: television
          command: mute

Example 2: Send a command repeatedly

# Example configuration.yaml entry
script:
  turn_up_tv_volume_20:
    sequence:
      - service: remote.send_command
        data:
          entity_id: remote.bedroom
          device: television
          command: volume up
          num_repeats: 20

Example 3: Send a sequence of commands

# Example configuration.yaml entry
script:
  turn_on_ac:
    sequence:
      - service: remote.send_command
        data:
          entity_id: remote.bedroom
          device: air conditioner
          command:
            - turn on
            - turn off display

Example 4: Send a single base64 code

# Example configuration.yaml entry
script:
  turn_on_tv:
    sequence:
      - service: remote.send_command
        data:
          entity_id: remote.bedroom
          command: b64:JgAcAB0dHB44HhweGx4cHR06HB0cHhwdHB8bHhwADQUAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA=

Example 5: Send a sequence of base64 codes

# Example configuration.yaml entry
script:
  turn_on_ac:
    sequence:
      - service: remote.send_command
        data:
          entity_id: remote.bedroom
          command:
            - b64:JgAcAB0dHB44HhweGx4cHR06HB0cHhwdHB8bHhwADQUAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA=
            - b64:JgAaABweOR4bHhwdHB4dHRw6HhsdHR0dOTocAA0FAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA=

Example 6: Mix commands and base64 codes

# Example configuration.yaml entry
script:
  turn_on_ac:
    sequence:
      - service: remote.send_command
        data:
          entity_id: remote.bedroom
          device: television
          command:
            - turn on
            - b64:JgAaABweOR4bHhwdHB4dHRw6HhsdHR0dOTocAA0FAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA=

Sensor

The sensor entities allow you to monitor Broadlink sensors. These entities are created automatically when you configure a device that has sensors.

Switch

The switch entities allow you to control and monitor Broadlink smart plugs, power strips and switches. You can turn them on and off, and you can monitor their state and power consumption, when available. These entities are created automatically when you configure a device that has switches.

You can also define custom IR/RF switches to be controlled with universal remote devices.

Setting up custom IR/RF switches

The first step is to configure the device normally via the configuration flow. Then add these lines to your configuration.yaml:

# Example configuration.yaml entry
switch:
  - platform: broadlink
    mac: MAC_ADDRESS
    switches:
      - name: Philips TV
        command_on: JgAcAB0dHB44HhweGx4cHR06HB0cHhwdHB8bHhwADQUAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA=
        command_off: JgAaABweOR4bHhwdHB4dHRw6HhsdHR0dOTocAA0FAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA=

The above example creates switch.philips_tv, which sends IR/RF codes using the universal remote with the MAC address provided.

Configuration Variables

mac stringRequired

The MAC address of the universal remote.

switches listRequired

The list that contains all custom switches.

name stringRequired

The name of the switch.

command_on string(Optional)

A base64 code to be sent as “turn on” command.

command_off string(Optional)

A base64 code to be sent as “turn off” command.

You can configure multiple switches for the same remote:

# Example configuration.yaml entry
switch:
  - platform: broadlink
    mac: MAC_ADDRESS
    switches:
      - name: Philips TV
        command_on: JgAcAB0dHB44HhweGx4cHR06HB0cHhwdHB8bHhwADQUAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA=
        command_off: JgAaABweOR4bHhwdHB4dHRw6HhsdHR0dOTocAA0FAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA=
      - name: LG TV
        command_on: JgBYAAABIJISExETETcSEhISEhQQFBETETcROBESEjcRNhM1EjcTNRMTERISNxEUERMSExE2EjYSNhM2EhIROBE3ETcREhITEgAFGwABH0oSAAwzAAEfShEADQU=
        command_off: JgBYAAABIJISExETETcSEhISEhQQFBETETcROBESEjcRNhM1EjcTNRMTERISNxEUERMSExE2EjYSNhM2EhIROBE3ETcREhITEgAFGwABH0oSAAwzAAEfShEADQU=

The above example creates switch.philips_tv and switch.lg_tv, which are related to the same universal remote.

IMPORTANT: Always use unique names for your switches. A good choice is to prefix the name with the area in which the device is located, e.g. Bedroom TV.

Using e-Control remotes

If you already have your remotes learned on e-Control app you can use this method to “copy” them to Home Assistant.

First get or learn all the remotes you want to add to Home Assistant in e-Control

  1. Download

    Get the script from here.

  2. Dump the data from the app

    Open the e-Control app on your mobile device. On the left side menu choose “Share” and then “Share to other phones in WLAN”. It will generate the files you will need for the script.

  3. Get data from your Android device

    Connect your Android device to your computer and browse the SD card/External Storage folder “/broadlink/newremote/SharedData/”. You need to get the following files and put them in the same folder as this script:

    jsonSubIr jsonButton jsonIrCode

  4. Install Requirements

    Run pip install simplejson. You must install simplejson in the same Python version you will use to run the scripts. You can ensure that the current version is installed by attempting to install again and confirming that you see “Requirement already satisfied”.

  5. Get the data from the device

    Navigate to the folder you downloaded and run python getBroadlinkSharedData.py. Follow the steps on screen. NOTE: These scripts were only tested with Python 2.7.

  6. Install python-broadlink library:

    git clone https://github.com/mjg59/python-broadlink.git
    cd python-broadlink
    sudo python setup.py install
    
  7. Test the codes Use the sendcode script you have already downloaded to test the codes you got from the device. You need to edit the script with your RM Pro IP Address and MAC Address and with the code in HEX format. When run the script, you know the code works when get message. Code sent… Not every code works.

  8. Convert the HEX codes to base64. Use this tool to convert the hex codes to base64 for use with Home Assistant.

Using iOS and Windows to obtain codes

  1. Use the e-Control app to learn the codes from all of your suitable remotes. Depending on the remote, try to add useful names for the buttons and/or the remotes. This will mean that you should only have to run this process once and will help with getting them quickly into Home Assistant. Dump the files in the app by navigating to the hamburger icon, select share and select, then choose Share to other phones on WLAN.

  2. Install Requirements

    • Download and install Python 2.7 on your windows PC.
    • Run pip install simplejson. You must install simplejson in the same Python version you will use to run the scripts. You can ensure that the current version is installed by attempting to install again and confirming that you see “Requirement already satisfied”.
    • Download and install iBackup Viewer.
    • Download these GitHub files. Make sure you place them in the \Python27 path in Windows. Be sure that the getBroadlinkSharedData.py from the download is in this directory.
  3. Plug your iPhone into your Windows PC, open iTunes and create a non-encrypted backup of your device.

  4. Open iBackup viewer then select the iOS backup that you created. Navigate to the App icon and then scroll until you find e-control.app, select this. Select and extract the files jsonButton, jsonIrCode and jsonSublr; they will be located in the Documents/SharedData section. Put these in the same location as the getBroadlinkSharedData.py.

  5. Now open a Command Prompt and navigate to the directory where the aforementioned files are located e.g., C:\Python27. Now run the command python getBroadlinkSharedData.py, you should see something like this:

    C:\Python27>python getBroadlinkSharedData.py
    ID: 1 | Name: TV
    ID: 2 | Name: Upstairs
    ID: 3 | Name: Sort in order
    ID: 4 | Name: Soundbar
    ID: 5 | Name: TV
    ID: 6 | Name: Xbox One
    ID: 7 | Name: User-Defined Aircon
    ID: 8 | Name: Sort in order
    ID: 9 | Name: User-Defined Aircon
    ID: 10 | Name: Kids Fan
    ID: 11 | Name: Downstairs
    ID: 12 | Name: Ceiling Fan
    ID: 13 | Name: Samsung TV
    ID: 14 | Name: Xbox One
    ID: 15 | Name: SONY SoundBar
    ID: 16 | Name: Fire TV
    ID: 17 | Name: New RF Remote
    

    Select the remote ID you would like to extract:

    Select accessory ID: 5
    [+] You selected:  TV
    [+] Dumping codes to TV.txt
    
  6. Now there should be a file with the name of the remote you chose in the same directory ending in .txt. Open that up and it will contain the Base64 code required for Home Assistant. To ensure these codes work correctly you may need to add == to the end of the code in your configuration.yaml file (or wherever you have your switches).

Using Windows to obtain codes with Broadlink Manager

  1. Install Broadlink Manager from this SourceForge link here.
  2. Open the application and hit “scan” to activate your broadlink device.
  3. Hit “Learn New Command” and follow instructions on screen.
  4. The “OnRawData Base64” is the value to be used with Home Assistant.

Using Node-RED to obtain codes

  1. Install the Broadlink Control palette in Node-RED (click the Hamburger menu at top right corner> Settings> Palette> Install and type Broadlink. Click install on the node-red-contrib-broadlink-control.

  2. Once installed, verify that the new palette titled broadlink is available in the nodes menu.

  3. Drag the RM node to an empty flow and double click to configure the node.

    a. give your RM device a name for easy identification
    b. click on the pencil to edit the device information
    c. enter the MAC address of the Broadlink RM PRO or RM Mini
    d. enter the IP address of the Broadlink RM PRO or RM mini
    e. leave the Catalog field empty.
    
  4. Click Update, and the device field should show the MAC address of the newly added device. If not, just select it.

  5. In the Action field, select Learn, then click Done.

  6. Drag an Inject node to the left of the RM node and link them. The type of inject doesn’t matter. Leave it to the defaults.

  7. Drag a Template node on the Flow to the right of the RM node and link it to the RM node.

  8. Double click the Template node to edit it, select:

    Property: msg.payload
    Format: Mustache template
    Template field: enter '{{payload.data}}'.
    Output as: Plain text
    
  9. Drag a Debug node to the right of the Template node and link them.

  10. Show the debug messages, deploy the flow and click on the inject button.

  11. A message will show in the debug window:

    3/23/2019, 9:56:53 AMnode: RM_Mini1
    msg : string[47]
    "Please tap the remote button within 30 seconds."
    
  12. Point the IR remote control at the RM device and click the desired button for about 2 seconds. An array of numbers will show in the debug window. For example:

    '38,0,132,3,19,18,19,18,19,18,19,17,20,54,20,54,20,54,19,18,19,18,19,18,19,17,20,17,20,17,20,54,20,17,19,18,19,18,19,18,19,17,20,17,20,54,20,17,20,54,19,55,19,54,20,54,20,54,19,55,19,0,6,6,150,146,20,54,20,54,20,54,19,18,19,18,19,18,19,17,20,17,20,54,20,54,19,55,19,18,19,17,20,17,20,17,20,17,20,17,20,54,19,18,19,18,19,18,19,17,20,17,20,17,20,54,19,18,19,55,19,54,20,54,20,54,20,54,19,55,19,0,6,6,150,146,20,54,20,54,19,55,19,18,19,17,20,17,20,17,20,17,20,54,19,55,19,54,20,17,20,17,20,17,20,17,20,17,19,18,19,55,19,17,20,17,20,17,20,17,20,17,19,18,19,55,19,18,19,54,20,54,20,54,19,55,19,54,20,54,20,0,6,5,150,146,20,54,20,54,20,54,19,18,19,18,19,18,19,17,20,17,20,54,20,54,19,55,19,18,19,17,20,17,20,17,20,17,20,17,20,54,19,18,19,18,19,18,19,17,20,17,20,17,20,54,19,18,19,55,19,54,20,54,20,54,19,55,19,54,20,0,6,6,149,147,20,54,19,55,19,54,20,17,20,17,20,17,20,17,20,17,19,55,19,54,20,54,20,17,20,17,20,17,19,18,19,18,19,18,19,54,20,17,20,17,20,17,20,17,19,18,19,18,19,54,20,17,20,54,20,54,20,54,19,...'
    

This is the code we need to transmit again to replicate the same remote function.

Using Node red to Transmit Codes

  1. Drag another RM node on the same flow we created earlier. The RM node should be configured to the RM device created earlier by default.

  2. In the Action field, select - Set from msg.payload -.

  3. Drag an Inject node and give it a meaningful name relevant to the remote control button function, like “TV On” or “TV Source”.

  4. Drag a template node and double click it to configure:

    Property: msg.payload
    Format: Mustache template
    Template: enter the following:
    '{
       "action" : "send",
       "data" : [ 38, 0, 34, 1, 40, 15, 40, 15 ] // Here you must enter the entire code from point 12 above, without the trailing "."
    }'
    In the Output as field, "select Parsed JSON".
    
  5. Click Done.

  6. Drag a debug node and connect it to the output of the RM node.

  7. Connect the Inject node to the Template node, and the template node to the RM node.

  8. Click Deploy to activate the flow, and then click the inject button. The debug window should show a debug message. For example:

    {"action":"send","data":   [38,0,152,0,0,1,39,148,19,18,18,19,18,55,19,18,18,19,18,19,18,19,18,55,18,56,18,19,18,55,18,19,18,56,18,18,19,55,18,19,18,19,18,18,18,56,18,19,18,18,19,55,18,56,18,18,19,18,18,19,18,19,18,55,19,18,18,19,18,19,18,19,18,18,18,19,18,19,18,55,19,55,18,19,18,19,18,18,19,18,18,56,18,19,18,18,19,55,18,56,18,18,19,18,18,19,18,19,18,19,18,18,19,18,18,56,18,55,18,19,18,19,18,19,18,18,19,55,18,19,18,55,19,18,18,56,18,19,18,18,19,18,18,19,18,19,18,19,18,18,18,56,18,0,13,5],"status":"OK"}
    

The “status” : “OK” at the end is a feedback that the Broadlink RM device is connected and has transmitted the payload.

Now you can add as many template nodes, each having a specific code, and add any type of input nodes to activate the template and transmit the code.

Using broadlink_cli to obtain codes

It is also possible to obtain codes using broadlink_cli from python-broadlink project.

First use discovery to find your Broadlink device:

$ ./broadlink_discovery
Discovering...
###########################################
RM2
# broadlink_cli --type 0x2787 --host 192.168.1.137 --mac 34ea34b45d2c
Device file data (to be used with --device @filename in broadlink_cli) :
0x2787 192.168.1.137 34ea34b45d2c
temperature = 27.1

Then use this info in a cli-command. IR and RF learning are supported.

Learning IR codes

Use --learn to obtain IR codes:

./broadlink_cli --learn --device "0x2787 192.168.1.137 34ea34b45d2c"
Learning...

Press a button on the remote and you get the code:

260058000001219512131114113910141114111411141114103911391114103911391139103911391039113911141039111411391015103911141114113910141139111410391114110005250001274b11000c520001274b11000d05
Base64: b'JgBYAAABIZUSExEUETkQFBEUERQRFBEUEDkROREUEDkRORE5EDkRORA5ETkRFBA5ERQRORAVEDkRFBEUETkQFBE5ERQQOREUEQAFJQABJ0sRAAxSAAEnSxEADQU='

Learning RF codes

Use --rfscanlearn to obtain RF codes:

$ ./broadlink_cli --rfscanlearn --device "0x2787 192.168.1.137 34ea34b45d2c"
Learning RF Frequency, press and hold the button to learn...

Press and hold a button on the remote.

Found RF Frequency - 1 of 2!
You can now let go of the button
Press enter to continue...

Press enter.

To complete learning, single press the button you want to learn

Short press the button and you get the code:

Found RF Frequency - 2 of 2!
b2002c0111211011211121112111212110112122101121112111202210211121112110221011211121112121102210112121111021112221101121211100017b10211111211121102111212210112121111121102111212210211121102210211111211121102122102111112121101121112122101121211000017c10211111211022102111212210112121111022102112202210211121102210221011211022102122102210112121101122102122101121211100017b10211111211121102210212210112122101121102210212210221021112110221011211121112121102210112121111121102122101121221000017b1121101121112111211121211110212210112111211121211121102210211121101121112111212111211011222110112111212111112121100005dc000000000000000000000000
Base64: b'sgAsAREhEBEhESERIREhIRARISIQESERIREgIhAhESERIRAiEBEhESERISEQIhARISERECERIiEQESEhEQABexAhEREhESEQIREhIhARISERESEQIREhIhAhESEQIhAhEREhESEQISIQIRERISEQESERISIQESEhEAABfBAhEREhECIQIREhIhARISERECIQIRIgIhAhESEQIhAiEBEhECIQISIQIhARISEQESIQISIQESEhEQABexAhEREhESEQIhAhIhARISIQESEQIhAhIhAiECERIRAiEBEhESERISEQIhARISERESEQISIQESEiEAABexEhEBEhESERIREhIREQISIQESERIREhIREhECIQIREhEBEhESERISERIRARIiEQESERISERESEhEAAF3AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA=='

Conversion of codes from other projects

For old/awkward devices another possibility is to try to get codes by using data gathered by the LIRC project.

Assuming that your (or similar) device is in one of these databases:

You can grab irdb2broadlinkha.sh from irdb2broadlinkha project and try to convert codes to format suitable for Home Assistant.